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The Pulp Magazine Archive

Pulp magazines (often referred to as "the pulps"), also collectively known as pulp fiction, refers to inexpensive fiction magazines published from 1896 through the 1950s. The typical pulp magazine was seven inches wide by ten inches high, half an inch thick, and 128 pages long. Pulps were printed on cheap paper with ragged, untrimmed edges.

The name pulp comes from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. Magazines printed on better paper were called "glossies" or "slicks." In their first decades, they were most often priced at ten cents per magazine, while competing slicks were 25 cents apiece. Pulps were the successor to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines are best remembered for their lurid and exploitative stories and sensational cover art. Modern superhero comic books are sometimes considered descendants of "hero pulps"; pulp magazines often featured illustrated novel-length stories of heroic characters, such as The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Phantom Detective.

The first "pulp" was Frank Munsey's revamped Argosy Magazine of 1896, about 135,000 words (192 pages) per issue on pulp paper with untrimmed edges and no illustrations, not even on the cover. While the steam-powered printing press had been in widespread use for some time, enabling the boom in dime novels, prior to Munsey, no one had combined cheap printing, cheap paper and cheap authors in a package that provided affordable entertainment to working-class people. In six years Argosy went from a few thousand copies per month to over half a million.

Street & Smith were next on the market. A dime novel and boys' weekly publisher, they saw Argosy's success, and in 1903 launched The Popular Magazine, billed as the "biggest magazine in the world" by virtue of being two pages longer than Argosy. Due to differences in page layout, the magazine had substantially less text than Argosy. The Popular Magazine introduced color covers to pulp publishing. The magazine began to take off when, in 1905, the publishers acquired the rights to serialize Ayesha, by H. Rider Haggard, a sequel to his popular novel She. Haggard's Lost World genre influenced several key pulp writers, including Edgar Rice Burroughs, Robert E. Howard, Talbot Mundy and Abraham Merritt. In 1907, the cover price rose to 15 cents and 30 pages were added to each issue; along with establishing a stable of authors for each magazine, this change proved successful and circulation began to approach that of Argosy. Street and Smith's next innovation was the introduction of specialized genre pulps, each magazine focusing on a genre such as detective stories, romance, etc.

At their peak of popularity in the 1920s and 1930s, the most successful pulps could sell up to one million copies per issue. The most successful pulp magazines were Argosy, Adventure, Blue Book and Short Stories described by some pulp historians as "The Big Four". Among the best-known other titles of this period were Amazing Stories, Black Mask, Dime Detective, Flying Aces, Horror Stories, Love Story Magazine, Marvel Tales, Oriental Stories, Planet Stories, Spicy Detective, Startling Stories, Thrilling Wonder Stories, Unknown, Weird Tales and Western Story Magazine. Although pulp magazines were primarily a US phenomenon, there were also a number of British pulp magazines published between the Edwardian era and World War Two. Notable UK pulps included Pall Mall Magazine, The Novel Magazine, Cassell's Magazine, The Story-Teller, The Sovereign Magazine, Hutchinson's Adventure-Story and Hutchinson's Mystery-Story. The German fantasy magazine Der Orchideengarten had a similar format to American pulp magazines, in that it was printed on rough pulp paper and heavily illustrated.

The Second World War paper shortages had a serious impact on pulp production, starting a steady rise in costs and the decline of the pulps. Beginning with Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine in 1941, pulp magazines began to switch to digest size; smaller, thicker magazines. In 1949, Street & Smith closed most of their pulp magazines in order to move upmarket and produce slicks.[8] The pulp format declined from rising expenses, but even more due to the heavy competition from comic books, television, and the paperback novel. In a more affluent post-war America, the price gap compared to slick magazines was far less significant. In the 1950s, Men's adventure magazines began to replace the pulp.

The 1957 liquidation of the American News Company, then the primary distributor of pulp magazines, has sometimes been taken as marking the end of the "pulp era"; by that date, many of the famous pulps of the previous generation, including Black Mask, The Shadow, Doc Savage, and Weird Tales, were defunct. Almost all of the few remaining pulp magazines are science fiction or mystery magazines now in formats similar to "digest size", such as Analog Science Fiction and Fact and Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine. The format is still in use for some lengthy serials, like the German science fiction weekly Perry Rhodan.

Over the course of their evolution, there were a huge number of pulp magazine titles; Harry Steeger of Popular Publications claimed that his company alone had published over 300, and at their peak they were publishing 42 titles per month. Many titles of course survived only briefly. While the most popular titles were monthly, many were bimonthly and some were quarterly. The collapse of the pulp industry changed the landscape of publishing because pulps were the single largest sales outlet for short stories. Combined with the decrease in slick magazine fiction markets, writers attempting to support themselves by creating fiction switched to novels and book-length anthologies of shorter pieces.

Pulp covers were printed in color on higher-quality (slick) paper. They were famous for their half-dressed damsels in distress, usually awaiting a rescuing hero. Cover art played a major part in the marketing of pulp magazines. The early pulp magazines could boast covers by some distinguished American artists; The Popular Magazine had covers by N.C. Wyeth, and Edgar Franklin Wittmack contributed cover art to Argosy and Short Stories. Later, many artists specialized in creating covers mainly for the pulps; a number of the most successful cover artists became as popular as the authors featured on the interior pages. Among the most famous pulp artists were Walter Baumhofer, Earle K. Bergey, Margaret Brundage, Edd Cartier, Virgil Finlay, Earl Mayan, Frank R. Paul, Norman Saunders, Nick Eggenhofer, (who specialized in Western illustrations), Rudolph Belarski and Sidney Riesenberg. Covers were important enough to sales that sometimes they would be designed first; authors would then be shown the cover art and asked to write a story to match.

Later pulps began to feature interior illustrations, depicting elements of the stories. The drawings were printed in black ink on the same cream-colored paper used for the text, and had to use specific techniques to avoid blotting on the coarse texture of the cheap pulp. Thus, fine lines and heavy detail were usually not an option. Shading was by crosshatching or pointillism, and even that had to be limited and coarse. Usually the art was black lines on the paper's background, but Finlay and a few others did some work that was primarily white lines against large dark areas.

Another way pulps kept costs down was by paying authors less than other markets; thus many eminent authors started out in the pulps before they were successful enough to sell to better-paying markets, and similarly, well-known authors whose careers were slumping or who wanted a few quick dollars could bolster their income with sales to pulps. Additionally, some of the earlier pulps solicited stories from amateurs who were quite happy to see their words in print and could thus be paid token amounts. There were also career pulp writers, capable of turning out huge amounts of prose on a steady basis, often with the aid of dictation to stenographers, machines or typists. Before he became a novelist, Upton Sinclair was turning out at least 8,000 words per day seven days a week for the pulps, keeping two stenographers fully employed. Pulps would often have their authors use multiple pen names so that they could use multiple stories by the same person in one issue, or use a given author's stories in three or more successive issues, while still appearing to have varied content. One advantage pulps provided to authors was that they paid upon acceptance for material instead of on publication; since a story might be accepted months or even years before publication, to a working writer this was a crucial difference in cash flow.

Some pulp editors became known for cultivating good fiction and interesting features in their magazines. Preeminent pulp magazine editors included Arthur Sullivant Hoffman (Adventure), Robert H. Davis (All-Story Weekly), Harry E. Maule (Short Stories) Donald Kennicott (Blue Book), Joseph T. Shaw (Black Mask), Farnsworth Wright (Weird Tales, Oriental Stories), John W. Campbell (Astounding Science Fiction,Unknown) and Daisy Bacon (Love Story Magazine, Detective Story Magazine).

Description of this collection from Wikipedia.

Many issues of this collection come from a variety of anonymous contributors, as well as sites such as The Pulp Magazines Project and ThePulp.net.

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texts 1,630

PART OF
Additional Collections

TOPIC
science fiction 232
young man 165
pulp 162
eyes 115
brady 104
king 103
stories 103
harry 101
king brady 100
bradys 96
amazing stories 95
young king 93
fiction 89
replied 77
science 76
years ago 70
motion picture 65
American wit and humor 59
full directions 59
long time 54
movie fan magazine 53
alice 51
ship 49
amazing 46
captain 43
full instructions 43
galaxy 42
galaxy science 42
man 40
adventures 39
tion 39
fantastic 37
detective 35
mentor 35
secret service 35
wall street 34
wild west 34
mentor association 32
young wild 32
san francisco 31
chinese 30
editorial staff 30
theater 30
association illustration 29
fantastic adventures 29
high school 28
reading time 28
liberty boys 27
ten years 27
young 27
fred fearnot 26
space ship 26
gossip 24
three men 24
William Desmond Taylor 23
horror 23
magazine 23
great deal 22
Capt. Billy's Whiz Bang 21
chinaman 21
martian 21
secret 21
fred 20
anp 19
liberty 19
thai 19
white man 19
wonder stories 19
worlds 19
detectives 18
film 18
planet 18
solar system 18
space 18
spare time 18
tlie 18
blue eyes 17
doc 17
startling stories 17
three years 17
Lisle Bell 16
fearnot 16
jerry 16
opium 16
send 16
sheriff 16
thrilling wonder 16
earth 15
frank 15
free 15
joe 15
men 15
monster 15
movie 15
tom 15
Motion Pictures 14
Roy K. Moulton 14
art 14
began 14
charley 14
frankenstein 14
great 14
pay postman 14
professor 14
sam 14
sir john 14
three days 14
true crime magazine 14
young lady 14
blake 13
comic 13
coupon 13
dick 13
good deal 13
green eyes 13
jack 13
mail coupon 13
railroad 13
startling 13
white men 13
Hollywood Gossip 12
billy 12
colonel 12
color 12
family circle 12
films 12
george 12
hollywood 12
human race 12
looked 12
mars 12
star trek 12
twenty years 12
young men 12
Mary Pickford 11
american 11
bill 11
doctor 11
epage 11
epage era 11
era 11
exclaimed 11
fantasy 11
fat man 11
ffl 11
headlines 11
jimmy 11
living room 11
los angeles 11
mystery 11
newspaper 11
reading 11
thrilling 11
thx 11
white house 11
wild 11
yer 11
york city 11
adventure 10
barney 10
comics 10
dan 10
doc savage 10
high priest 10
horror film 10
howard austin 10
jeff 10
lie 10
london 10
marvel 10
monograph number 10
pulps 10
robot 10
science stories 10
stood 10
tales 10
air 9
air force 9
ami 9
carter 9
cried 9
fantastic universe 9
ffi 9
gun 9
hank 9
human beings 9
jim 9
lon chaney 9
mentor reading 9
moon 9
music 9
planet stories 9
ralph 9
shadow 9
special effects 9
stared 9
stories quarterly 9
tony 9
uncle 9
universe 9
LANGUAGE
english 1,493
SHOW DETAILS
Title
Date Published
Creator
Vol I, No. 1 (March 16, 1915), No. 2 (March 23, 1915), No. 3 (March 30, 1915), No. 4 (April 6, 1915), No. 6 (April 20, 1915), No. 7 (April 27, 1915), No. 8 (May 4, 1915), No. 9 (May 11, 1915), No. 10 (May 22, 1915), No. 11 (May 29, 1915), No. 15 (July 3, 1915), No. 17 (July 17, 1915), No. 19 (July 31, 1915). Publisher: Photo-Play Review, Phildelphia, PA
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Victoria Forde, Gertrude McCoy, Charles Chaplin, Thomas Ince,...
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing columns or articles written by Louella O. Parsons, and published in The Morning Telegraph between January-April 1922.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Louella O. Parsons, Ernst Lubitsch, Emil Shauer, Jane Murfin, Harold Lloyd, Ralph...
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing columns or articles written by Louella O. Parsons, and published in The Morning Telegraph between September-December 1923. These were the final columns by Parsons for the Morning Telegraph before she went to work for Hearst's New York American.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Louella O. Parsons, Lon Chaney, Jetta Goudal, Lillian Clarke, Tom Terriss, Gloria...
Topics: fisher, cromek, lowena, logan, chuck, hut, fantasy, benedict, john stuart, thai, prince henry, ihe...
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing a Sunday column of Hollywood movie news, usually written by Frances Agnew, and published in The Morning Telegraph between 1922-1923.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Hollywood, Frances Agnew, Joseph P. Reddy
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. Pages from The Morning Telegraph (New York City) published in 1923 with testimony of hearings held by the Federal Trade Commission investigating trade practices of Famous Players-Lasky. Includes testimony by H. H. Hodkinson, Al Lichtman, Samuel L. Rothafel, Richard Rowland, Samuel Goldwyn, Winfield Sheehan, Robert Cochrane, J. D. Williams, Thomas A. Edison, Sydney Cohen.
Topics: motion picture industry, restraint of trade
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing columns or articles written by Louella O. Parsons, and published in The Morning Telegraph between January-April 1923.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Louella O. Parsons, William Duncan, Gladys Cooper, Ramon Novarro, Victor Seastrom,...
Vol. I, No. 9 (July 4, 1914), No. 10 (July 11, 1914), No. 11 (July 18, 1914), No. 12 (July 25, 1914), No. 13 (August 1, 1914), No. 14 (August 8, 1914), No. 15 (August 15, 1914), No. 16 (August 22, 1914), No. 17 (August 29, 1914). Publisher: Cloud Pub. Co., Chicago, Ill.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Jesse Lasky, William J. Burns, Siegmund Lubin, Richard C....
( 1 reviews )
Topics: eyes, dime, mystery, enden, face, stood, cameron, stewart, dime mystery, kelland, dread desire,...
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing columns or articles written by Louella O. Parsons, and published in The Morning Telegraph between May-August 1923.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Louella O. Parsons, Alfred Lunt, Lynn Fontaine, Lew Cody, Mae Murray, Margaret...
Vol. VIII, No. 1. October 1923. Publisher: Screenland Inc., Cooperstown, N.Y.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Rudolph Valentino, John Held Jr., Robert E. Sherwood, Frederick...
Vol. I, No. 18 (Sept. 5, 1914), No. 19 (Sept. 12, 1914), No. 20 (Sept. 19, 1914), No. 21 (Oct. 1, 1914), No. 22 (Oct. 15, 1914), No. 23 (Nov. 1914). Publisher: Cloud Pub. Co., Chicago, Ill.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Cleo Madison, David Wark Griffith, Horace Plimpton, Daniel...
Vol. III, No. 36. August 1922. Publisher: Robbinsdale, Minn. : W.H. Fawcett
Topics: American wit and humor, Capt. Billy's Whiz Bang, Hollywood Gossip
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing columns or articles written by Louella O. Parsons, and published in The Morning Telegraph between May-August 1922.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Louella O. Parsons, Clara Beranger, Edward Russell, Bull Montana, Mary Carr,...
Topics: girl, watcher, ami, goddess, lime, ihr, wanna, cirl, girl watcher, ihc, love goddess, kitten type,...
Vol. I, No. 24 (Feb. 1915), No. 25 (Mar. 1915), No. 26 (May 1915), Vol. II, No. 1 (July 1915), No. 2 (Aug. 1915), No, 3 (Sept. 1915), No. 4 (Oct. 1915). Publisher: Photoplaywright's Association of America, Chicago, Ill.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Edna Mayo, Marc MacDermott, David Wark Griffith, Betty Nansen,...
( 1 reviews )
Topics: rush, stacey, buzz, devore, mammoth, adventure, inca, deacon, mammoth adventure, indian, howard...
Publisher: The Lewis Publishing Co., New York City. These are pages containing columns or articles written by Louella O. Parsons, and published in The Morning Telegraph between September-December 1922.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Louella O. Parsons, Evelyn Greeley, George Eastman, Pola Negri, Thomas Meighan,...
Vol. I, No. 20 (August 7, 1915), No. 22 (August 21, 1915), No. 23 (August 28, 1915), No. 25 (Sept. 11, 1915), No. 26 (Sept. 18, 1915), Vo. 2, No. 1 (Sept. 25, 1915), No. 2 (Oct. 2, 1915), No. 3 (Oct. 9, 1915), No. 5 (Oct. 23, 1915), No. 7 (Nov. 6, 1915), No. 7 (Nov. 13, 1915). Publisher: Photo-Play Review, Phildelphia, PA
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Lillian Walker, Epes Sargent, Winifred Kingston, Oscar Gardner,...
Issues of The Photoplayers Weekly. Vol. 2, No. 9 (May 7, 1915), 10 (May 14, 1915), 11 (May 21, 1915), 12 (June 2, 1915), 13 (June 9, 1915), 14 (June 16, 1915), 15 (June 23, 1915), 16 (July 1, 1915), 17 (July 8, 1915), 18 (July 15, 1915), 19 (July 22, 1915, 20 (July 29, 1915). Publisher: The Western Film Pub. Co., Los Angeles, Cal.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Film Industry Trade Publication
True Detective MysteriesVol. XIII, No. 7. October 1930Publisher: New Metropolitan Fiction, Inc., Dunellen, NJ
Topics: true crime magazine, Fred Burke, Arnold Rothstein, John Hays Hammond Jr., Clara Phillips, William...
Issues of The Photoplayers Weekly. Vol. III, No. 34 (Apr. 1, 1916), 35 (Apr. 8, 1916), 36 (Apr. 15, 1916), 37 (Apr. 22, 1916), 38 (Apr. 29, 1916), 39 (May 6, 1916), 40 (May 13, 1916), 41 (May 20, 1916), 42 (May 27, 1916), 43 (June 3, 1916), 44 (June 10, 1916), 45 (June 17, 1916), 46 (June 24, 1916), 47 (July 1, 1916), 48 (July 8, 1916), 49 (July 15, 1916), 50 (July 22, 1916), 51 (July 29, 1916), 52 (Aug. 5, 1916). Also, Vol. 4, No. 8 (Feb. 17, 1917). Publisher: Photoplayers Publishing Co., Los...
Topics: Motion Pictures, Film Industry Trade Publication
Vol. 2, No. 5. 1 May 1922. Publisher: F. W. Millar & Co, Ltd., Wellington, New Zealand
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, theater, vaudeville, music
Vol. I, No. 3 (May 23, 1914); No. 4 (May 30, 1914); No. 5 (June 6, 1914); No. 6 (June 13, 1914); No. 7 (June 20, 1914); No. 8 (June 27, 1914). Publisher: Cloud Pub. Co., Chicago, Ill.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Ford Sterling, Kathlyn Williams, Ruth Stonehouse, Lincoln...
Vol. 35, No. 397, May 1922 Publisher: Leslie-Judge Co., New York City
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, John Henry Jr., Mary Pickford, Walter Prichard Eaton
Four issues of Town Topics: Vol. LXXXVII, No. 5 (Feb. 2), 6 (Feb 9), 7 (Feb. 16), 8 (Feb. 23). Publisher: Town Topics Publishing Co., New York.
Topics: New York society gossip, American wit and humor, theater, Helene Hicks Bowen, Paul Halvy, Cleves...
Topics: caskey, childers, kean, valdez, send, smith, detective, worm, grace smith, sheriff, detective...
Topics: cassius, hollywood, pills, liz, holden, khan, sex, liston, cassius clay, clay, high school, bill...
Topics: fort, sonny, lauderdale, hollywood, beverly, diane, hypnosis, baumholder, fort lauderdale, cops,...
( 1 reviews )
Topics: messer, duardo, captain, chugger, adventure, ambrose, genoese, dan, jock, messer duardo, holy...
Issues of The Photoplayers Weekly. Vol. 1, No. 20 (Nov. 28, 1914), 21 (Dec. 5, 1914), 22 (Dec. 12, 1914), 23 (Dec. 19, 1914), 24 (Dec. 26, 1914), 25 (Jan. 2, 1915), 26 (Jan. 9, 1915), 27 (Jan. 16, 1915), 28 (Jan. 23, 1915), 29 (Jan. 30, 1915), 30 (Feb. 6, 1915), 31 (Feb. 13, 1915). Publisher: The Western Film Pub. Co., Los Angeles, Cal.
Topics: Motion Pictures, Film Industry Trade Publication
The Pulp Magazine Archive
by Bruce Long
1,048
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An index to articles on film performers within the pages of Movie Weekly, a fan magazine published from 1921 to 1925.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine
Playboy 1962.09 The Bloody Pulps
Topics: pulps, pulp, adventures, doc, buffalo, tales, shadow, magazine, adventure, stories, doc savage,...
Topics: snips, larry, sandy, maxe, lew, gun, frazer, eyes, sam lester, dirk, craig manton, black market,...
Topics: rob, parker, armand, louann, ferencz, adam, lalaurie, lentz, angeles, los angeles, buddy lentz,...
Vol. III, No. 29. January 1922. Publisher: Robbinsdale, Minn. : W.H. Fawcett
Topics: American wit and humor, Capt. Billy's Whiz Bang, Hollywood Gossip
Vol. IX, No. 2 Publisher: Brewster Publications, Inc., Jamaica, NY
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Betty Blythe, Jackie Coogan, Helen Ferguson, Claire Windsor,...
Day Donald B. - Index To The Science Fiction Magazines 1926-1950-Ak Jpg
Topics: asf, amz, dec, oct, jun, nov, jul, feb, aug, sep, asf jul, asf nov, asf oct, asf sep, asf jan, asf...
True Detective MysteriesVol. XIII, No. 6. September 1930Publisher: New Metropolitan Fiction, Inc., Dunellen, NJ
Topics: true crime magazine, William Desmond Taylor, black hand, Irene Schroeder, Carolyn Wells, Frank...
Vol. IV, No. 2. April, 1922. Publisher: Screenland Publishing Company, Atascadero, Cal.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Elinor Glyn, Gene Stratton-Porter, Cosmo Hamilton, Frank...
Uncanny Tales (November 1940)
( 2 reviews )
Topics: thai, tales, zola, uncanny, hut, howett, lie, looglay, uncanny tales, talking heads, day zaung,...
Vol. III, No. 35. July 1922. Publisher: Robbinsdale, Minn. : W.H. Fawcett
Topic: American wit and humor, Capt. Billy's Whiz Bang, Hollywood Gossip
Vol. III, No. 30. February 1922. Publisher: Robbinsdale, Minn. : W.H. Fawcett
Topics: American wit and humor, Capt. Billy's Whiz Bang, Hollywood Gossip
Topics: becker, grenfell, tanaka, gant, ikari, starker, cortino, larsen, quirie, captain ikari, years ago,...
Titan Tribune, Vol.  IV, 1962-63. Published by the Associated Student Body of Pioneer High School, Whittier, California.
Topics: student newspaper, high school
Topics: duke, jake, dave, ellen, bart, gun, manny, eyes, detective tales, jimmy, thirty years, left hand,...
Topics: sex, bette, kennedy, send, coupon, jim, men, sexual, bette morse, mel, capra gems, mail coupon, jim...
Topics: thai, girl, die, waitkus, leafs, gilfoyle, watcher, earl, girl watcher, ami, loaded gun
Islands in the Sky (1956.Winston) - Arthur C. Clarke
Topics: islands, sky, space, commander, station, earth, gravity, ship, doyle, commander doyle, morning...
Issues of The Photoplayers Weekly. Vol. III, No. 7 (Sept. 18, 1915), 8 (Sept. 25, 1915), 9 (Oct. 2, 1915), 10 (Oct. 9, 1915), 11 (Oct. 16, 1915), 12 (Oct. 23, 1915), 13 (Oct. 30, 1915), 14 (Nov. 6, 1915), 15 (Nov. 13, 1915), 16 (Nov. 20, 1915), 17 (Nov. 27, 1915), 18 (Dec. 4, 1915), 19 (Dec. 11, 1915), 20 (Dec. 18, 1915), 21 (Dec. 25, 1915), 22 (Jan. 1, 1916), 23 (Jan. 8, 1916), 24 (Jan. 15, 1916), 25 (Jan. 22, 1916), 26 (Jan 29, 1916), 27 (Feb. 5, 1916), 28 (Feb. 12, 1916), 31 (Mar. 4, 1916),...
Topics: Motion Pictures, Film Industry Trade Publication
( 1 reviews )
Topics: sheena, bambala, jungle, bob, tamba, chim, trail, bearers, eyes, white man, jungle girl, jungle...
Vol. VI, No. 4 Publisher: Physical Culture Corporation, New York City
Topic: Fiction
Titan Tribune, Vol.  III, 1961-62. Published by the Associated Student Body of Pioneer High School, Whittier, California.
Topics: student newspaper, high school
True Detective MysteriesVol. XIII, No. 2. May 1930Publisher: New Metropolitan Fiction, Inc., Dunellen, NJ
Topics: true crime magazine, Frank Sislby, Jim Byrnes, William Crowley, scopolamine, Harvey Crippen, Tom...
The Pulp Magazine Archive
714
2
0
Topics: cosmic, thinsell, stories, tion, boyle, wing, randolph, cantrell, cosmic stories, planet, real...
Topics: brick, michael, yuh, clavijo, rudolfo, silent, adventure, bunty, grand cham, bembo, captain blood,...
Topics: dink, bingler, art, crandall, eyes, detective, orchids, clint, crack detective, werner, captain...
The Pulp Magazine Archive
691
2
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Volume 32 Number 1 Spawn of Dagon - Henry Kuttner A weird story of Elak of Atlantis, and the worship of the fish-god Fortune's Fools - Seabury Quinn A thrill-tale of the Dark Ages, about wolves that were men, and men that were wolves Dust in the House - David H. Keller A shuddery story about the skeletons that sat across the table from each other The Defense Rests - Julius Long An eery tale of a heartless lawyer, who nevertheless wanted to acquit bis own murderer The Messenger - H. P. Lovecraft...
Topics: pulp, Weird Tales
Vol. II, No. 6. December 1915. Publisher: Photoplaywright's Association of America, Chicago, Ill.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Wallace A. Carlson, William Desmond Taylor, Miriam Nesbitt,...
Vol. II, No. 8. April 1, 1922. Publisher: Physical Culture Corporation, New York City
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, William Desmond Taylor, Lillian Gish, Dorothy Gish, Herbert...
Topics: blake, telsa, gerald, antoinette, felton, thorn, marie, thom, marie antoinette, duck hunting, house...
Topics: coupon, send, sex, chicago, hair, carroll, mail, color, skin, pay postman, mail coupon, purchase...
Vol. XVIV, No. 2. January 1921Publisher: Photoplay Publishing Co., Chicago, Ill.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Wallace Reid, William S. Hart, Bebe Daniels, Estelle Taylor,...
Vol. II, No. 4. March 4, 1922. Publisher: Physical Culture Corporation, New York City
( 2 reviews )
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, John Gilbert, Leatrice Joy, Rudolph Valentino
Vol. III, No. 32. April 1922. Publisher: Robbinsdale, Minn. : W.H. Fawcett
Topics: American wit and humor, Capt. Billy's Whiz Bang, Hollywood Gossip
dirty pictures 003 - pulp art of the 1930s
Topics: spicy, appeared, originally, dirty, mystery, art, pulps, barreaux, pictures, malibu, originally...
Vol. IX, No. 3 Publisher: Brewster Publications, Inc., Jamaica, NY
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Wallace Reid, Pauline Frederick, Dorothy Dalton, May Collins,...
Vol. II, No. 10. April 15, 1922. Publisher: Physical Culture Corporation, New York City
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, William Desmond Taylor, Richard Barthelmess, Charles Chaplin,...
Vol. I, No. 12. June 1922. Publisher: The Magazine Corporation, Indianapolis, Ind. Missing pages 26-27, 31-32, 37-38.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Constance Binney, Doris Kenyon, Alice Calhoun, William Duncan,...
Vol. III, No. 4. December 1921. Publisher: Screenland Publishing Company, Atascadero, Cal.
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, Lorna Moon, Marion Fairfax, Virginia Rappe, David Anthony...
Usborne Book of the Future 1979 (pointlessmuseum)
( 1 reviews )
Topics: cities, shuttle, travel, robots, space, star, worlds, solar, eist, trucks, star travel, space...
Topics: darrell, smoking, fantasy, eyes, priestess, goddess, sylvia, looked, merritts fantasy, smoking...
True Detective MysteriesVol. XII, No. 2. November 1929Publisher: New Metropolitan Fiction, Inc., Dunellen, NJ
Topics: true crime magazine, Charles H. Tuttle, Frances St. John Smith, Johnnie Green, Leighton Mount,...
Vol. 34, No. 381, January 1921 Publisher: Leslie-Judge Co., New York City
Topics: motion picture, movie fan magazine, James D. Williams, Willis Goldbeck
The Pulp Magazine Archive
598
2
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Topics: curt, ezra, shaler, garrand, kirkendall, startling, shandakor, baldwin, curt newton, otho, ezra...